Latin American Art in a Bold New Direction






“Antropofagia” (“Cannibalism”), 1929, a seminal work of Brazilian Modernism by Tarsila do Amaral that is part of a new show of her work at MoMA.

“Antropofagia” (“Cannibalism”), 1929, a seminal work of Brazilian Modernism by Tarsila do Amaral that is part of a new show of her work at MoMA.

 

Recently, New York museums have presented retrospectives of all three of the most influential artists of Brazil’s postwar avant-garde. Lygia Clark, with her hinged-metal sculptures you can fiddle with at will, filled the top floor of the Museum of Modern Art. Lygia Pape, known for bold, participative performances and sculptures of iridescent gold filaments, appeared at the Met Breuer. And Hélio Oiticica was the man of the hour this summer at the Whitney, live birds and all.

 

 

 

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“A Cuca,” 1924, a Tarsila painting with folkloric influences.  Credit Musée de Grenoble, via Museum of Modern Art

 

 

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